Word of the Day: Oppugn | Merriam-Webster

Word of the Day : August 17, 2017

oppugn

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verb uh-PYOON

Definition

1 : to fight against

2 : to call in question

Did You Know?

Oppugn was first recorded in English in the 15th century. It came to Middle English from the Latin verb oppugnare, which in turn derived from the combination of ob-, meaning “against,” and pugnare, meaning “to fight.” Pugnare itself is descended from the same ancient word that gave Latin the word pugnus, meaning “fist.” It’s no surprise, then, that oppugn was adopted into English to refer to fighting against something or someone, either physically (as in “the dictatorship will oppugn all who oppose it”) or verbally (as in “oppugn an argument”). Other descendants of pugnare in English include the equally aggressive pugnaciousimpugnrepugnant, and the rare inexpugnable(“incapable of being subdued or overthrown”).

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Word of the Day: Chthonic | Merriam-Webster ** editorial/shared 

Cool word… Love Greek; wish I could read it.

Word of the Day : August 6, 2017

chthonic

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adjective THAH-nik

Definition

: of or relating to the underworld :infernal

Did You Know?

Chthonic might seem a lofty and learned word, but it’s actually pretty down-to-earth in its origin and meaning. It comes from chthōn, which means “earth” in Greek, and it is associated with things that dwell in or under the earth. It is most commonly used in discussions of mythology, particularly underworld mythology. Hades and Persephone, who reign over the underworld in Greek mythology, might be called “chthonic deities,” for example. Chthonic has broader applications, too. It can be used to describe something that resembles a mythological underworld (e.g., “chthonic darkness”), and it is sometimes used to describe earthly or natural things (as opposed to those that are elevated or celestial).

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Word of the Day: Haphazard | Merriam-Webster

How I feel my blog is going…

Word of the Day : July 24, 2017

haphazard

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adjective hap-HAZZ-erd

Definition

: marked by lack of plan, order, or direction

Did You Know?

The hap in haphazard comes from an English word that means “happening,” as well as “chance or fortune,” and that derives from the Old Norse word happ, meaning “good luck.” Perhaps it’s no accident that hazard also has its own connotations of luck: while it now refers commonly to something that presents danger, at one time it referred to a dice game similar to craps. (The name ultimately derives from the Arabic al-zahr, meaning “the die.”) Haphazardfirst entered English as a noun (again meaning “chance”) in the 16th century, and soon afterward was being used as an adjective to describe things with no apparent logic or order.

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