Book Review: Crux by Jean Guerrero

Crux: A Cross-Border MemoirCrux: A Cross-Border Memoir by Jean Guerrero
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

3.5 stars rounded up.

Thank you to Random House for this Advanced Reader’s Edition. It came in a set of three books, two were memoirs.

On the whole, I don’t read a lot of memoirs, and this book is a fine example of why. It is written by a woman trying to make sense of her relationship with her father. While I was reading her life story, not yet to her teen years and she was already annoying me. Work it out with your therapist, don’t subject me to it. I usually won’t stop a book once I’ve started (especially an ARC), but I decided I’d reassess at the half way mark.

I did make my way through the entire book in three days. It’s an easy enough read (just not my thing). I rounded up on my stars since my review might be skewed by personal preference, and that’s not the books fault.

The travel and mysticism kept it interesting for me.

If the subject interests you, go for it.

Read 5//27-29/18

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Book Review: This is How I Save My Life by Amy B. Scher

This Is How I Save My Life: From California to India, a True Story Of Finding Everything When You Are Willing To Try AnythingThis Is How I Save My Life: From California to India, a True Story Of Finding Everything When You Are Willing To Try Anything by Amy B. Scher

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

5 stars.

Thank you to GoodReads, the author Amy B. Scher, and @Gallery Books / Simon & Schuster for this Advanced Readers Copy to review.

Over the years, several people have told me I should write about my journey with Lyme disease and chronic illness. Now I don’t need to, Amy Scher has told a story that mirrors mine, except I’m hoping to try stem cell therapy in the next year or two; it’s something I’ve been researching since I was first disabled in 2009. Almost ten years later, I’m almost ready to try it, and this book comes out. Synchronicity.

What she writes could be a page out of my life (pg 163):
“I could never do what you are doing.”
Honestly, I’m no superhero. You could totally rock this too, if you had to. In fact, we could all do anything if we absolutely had to. I once thought I could never do what I’m doing either, except for now I don’t have a choice and that’s exactly how I’m doing it in the first place. Some nights when I go to bed, I think to myself ‘I cannot do this, not for one more day.’ Eventually I fall asleep…and then…I wake up with a life that is just waiting for me to wade through all over again. You do it because even when — especially when — you think you can’t you’re somehow still making it happen. And you do it every minute of every day — no breaks allowed — because if you don’t every single thing that you’ve barely been holding on to might fall apart too.

The writing in this book is outstanding. The honesty is heart wrenching.

I’m done, because I don’t have the energy to type any longer.

If you’re chronically ill, or know someone who is chronically ill, you should read this book. If you have Lyme disease, this is a must.

4/11-23/18

GoodReads review

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Book Review: The Obsidian Chamber by Preston & Child

The Obsidian Chamber (Pendergast #16)The Obsidian Chamber by Douglas Preston
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

5 stars.

Number 16 in the Pendergast series.

Though this is set in current day, the characters and world are quite developed. This is a series I highly recommend reading from the beginning. A series I highly recommend.

Read 3/11-13/18

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Book Review – The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester

The Professor and the MadmanThe Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

5+ stars.

Brilliantly constructed.

Written by a true philologist. I do not think this subject could have, or should have been written by anyone else.

An apt quote from the book: “Few are the books that can offer so much please to look at, to touch, to skim, to read” (p. 89). This is one of those books.

Perhaps one of the reasons I’m such a fan of Victorian writing, “…any grand new dictionary ought to be itself a democratic product, a book that demonstrated the primacy of individual freedoms, of the notion that one could use words freely, as one liked, without any hard and fast rules of lexical conduct.” It continues:
“Any such dictionary certainly should not be an absolutist, autocratic project, such as the French had in mind. The English, who had raised eccentricity and poor organization to a high art, and placed the scatterbrain on a pedestal, loathed such middle European things as rules, conventions, and dictatorships. They abhorred the idea of diktats – about the language, for Heaven’s sake! – emanating from some secretive body of unaccountable immortals.”

The Victorian era is my favorite in all ways. After reading this book I feel more literate and educated.

The reading suggestions at the end are also particularly noteworthy.

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