Has marijuana prohibition affected you? ** essay/shared 

To whom it may concern, 

I am a Lyme, Fibromyalgia, CFS, Hashimoto’s, CIDP, and more others, patient. Along with chronic pain,  I have daily headaches and migraines. Because I do not fit into New Jersey’s rigid medical marijuana guidelines, I have no alternative but to use legal prescription opiods, pain killers, migraine medication, and muscle relaxers, on a daily basis. Also, because I don’t drive and my current financial situation, even if i was eligible, I have no way to get to a dispensery, or the means to pay. 

As a Medicare patient, medical marijuana should be available as a prescription by any doctor who can prescribe opiods, should be easily accessible to the disabled, and covered under prescription pharmacy plans.

Or, follow the Colorado model and make it available to all, taxing and keeping quality control in place. The increase in taxes can be used for education at all levels. 

Very sincerely, 

Leigh Mann 

Disabled since 2009

Share your story with us.

Drug Policy Alliance
Leigh,

Just a couple months ago, we launched our campaign to legalize marijuana in New Jersey to ensure it’s fair and equitable and does not continue the harms of marijuana prohibition. 

There are severe long-term consequences for New Jerseysans who’ve experienced a marijuana arrest or conviction including making it more difficult to get a job, housing, student loans or even a driver’s license! And marijuana laws have been used to support biased policies like stop and frisk, racial profiling and the deportation of people of color. 

Right now we’re collecting stories from New Jerseyans who’ve been personally affected. If you or someone you know has been negatively impacted by marijuana prohibition, please share your story by emailing Meagan Glaser at mglaser@drugpolicy.org or call our office at 609-396-8613 (we can guarantee anonymity if necessary). 

Our New Solutions Marijuana Reform Campaign is looking to highlight these struggles in our advocacy. Legislators need to hear stories from their constituents to help them understand how harmful our current marijuana laws are and the importance of legalizing marijuana in a fair and equitable way that works to repair these past harms.

In an effort to collect as many personal stories as possible so we can have the biggest impact, please be sure to forward this message to other New Jerseyans you think may be directly affected and interested in sharing the challenges they faced due to a marijuana arrest and/or conviction. 

With your help and stories, I’m confident we can show lawmakers how much damage prohibition has done and end it by legalizing marijuana in New Jersey. 
 

  Sincerely,

Roseanne Scotti
Director, New Jersey
Drug Policy Alliance

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Drug Policy Alliance

131 West 33rd St., 15th Floor New York, NY 10001

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Drug Possession: The Criminalization Of Youth ** editorial/reblog

Just thinking about this when I heard an anti-marijuana advertisement on the radio, Friday, on a New York city area station.

The Conversation Room

The words we use matter. Be it ‘junkie’ instead of ‘addict’ or ‘she had a few drinks’ versus ‘she took drugs’ the words chosen shape the emotional response.

The callous attitude which wants us to maintain criminal penalty for petty drug possession is not one premised in practicality or reasonableness. It is an ideological belief  that sees drug users as impure and addicts as a subhuman scourge who block the way into Brown Thomas.

For these people, a young person having their stomach pumped from excessive alcohol intake is ‘a naïve teen that went too far’ a 24-year-old sitting at a field listening to their favourite band caught smoking cannabis is a ‘criminal’ to be put in handcuffs, humiliatingly escorted out of the venue by police and given a criminal record scarring her life prospects forever.

This is the reality of criminalizing possession that many overlook. A bizarre, wholly ineffective…

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