Book review: How to Walk Away by Katherine Center

How to Walk AwayHow to Walk Away by Katherine Center
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

5 stars.

ARC from the publisher, thank you very much St. Martin’s Press for this early edition; also to Shelf Awareness for the opportunity.

This first person narrative is lovely and real. If I were ever to write fiction, this is a style and voice that would appeal to me.

I *knew* I shouldn’t start this after dinner. As much as I wanted to sleep, “One more chapter, please?” If you start in the morning with an open day, you might be able to tuck this away in one sitting. I’d recommend that, if possible.

Being chronically ill for the last nine years, using a cane or wheelchair for all outings and being in almost constant pain, this book hit home. Life can change overnight (or in an instant) and one has to appreciate the good and live in the moment as much as possible.

From the publisher letter:
“Life can change in the blink of an eye.
But strength is found in weakness.
Laughter lives in the darkest moments.
And love shows up when you learn to move on.”

I can attest to the truth of this.

This book made me laugh out loud, cry more than once (and I rarely cry), and smile wistfully while my heart sang.

Thank you Katherine Center, for a difficult, but beautiful, book.

Read: 3/8-3/9/2018

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Word of the Day: Hebetude | Merriam-Webster

Since my disability due to chronic illness, I often feel hebetudinous. Healthy people tell me to exercise, or even walk, thinking that will help me. It’s difficult to comprehend Exercise Intolerance until you’ve experienced it. Recovery from exertion or falling is worse than being still to begin with and only doing what I can handle, when I can handle it. I only wish my friends could understand why I use a wheelchair outside of the house. 

hebetude

play

noun HEB-uh-tood

Definition

: lethargydullness

Did You Know?

Hebetude usually suggests mental dullness, often marked by laziness or torpor. As such, it was a good word for one Queenslander correspondent, who wrote in a letter to the editor of the Weekend Australian of “an epidemic of hebetude among young people who … are placing too great a reliance on electronic devices to do their thinking and remembering.” Hebetude comes from Late Latin hebetudo, which means pretty much the same thing as our word. It is also closely related to the Latin word for “dull,” hebes, which has extended meanings such as “obtuse,” “doltish,” and “stupid.” Other hebe- words in English include hebetudinous (“marked by hebetude”) and hebetate (“to make dull”).

https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day